Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 234567
Results 61 to 65 of 65

Thread: Sierra Tower Specifications, Measurements, Pricing

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Tower Crossovers?

    Quote Originally Posted by davef View Post
    Hi Jay,

    Without revealing too much info, the crossover slopes on the Sierra-1 are not "continuously" variable. A typical crossover slope decays at the same rate, for example, energy is reduced 24dB per octave. In a variable slope crossover, energy might be reduced at 12dB per octave for a specific frequency bandwidth and then increased to 24dB per octave for another frequency bandwidth. We use this in all of our loudspeakers...
    Dave, it would be very easy for a competitor to fully understand you crossover by simply buying a speaker and doing a simple analysis of the components and interconnects. I used to do some competitor analysis of ICs and it isn't that hard to figure out how things work, including the micro-code.

    What convinced me to buy three of your speakers (and getting ready to buy two more) was the extensive amount of data on them that your web site has available, and the great reviews on other sites. Keep up the good work!

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,631

    Default Re: Sierra Tower Specifications, Measurements, Pricing

    Quote Originally Posted by xdieget View Post
    A question about specs-- I see that the towers are rated at 4 ohm average impedance. But wondering if the wattages listed for recommended power, maximum continuous power, maximum peak power are into 8 ohms or 4 ohms? In other words, should my power amp be rated at 300 wpc into 8 ohm or 4 ohm to match continuous power rating? This info isn't going to determine which amp I get, but was just wondering.
    The impedance rating of a loudspeaker does not affect the power ratings for the loudspeaker itself. In other words, if the speaker is rated at 100 watts max input power, it would be 100 watts max regardless of the impedance rating of the loudspeaker.

    In other words, should my power amp be rated at 300 wpc into 8 ohm or 4 ohm to match continuous power rating?
    Your amplifier does not need to be rated into a 4 ohm load as the Sierra Towers are a rather easy load to drive. In addition, you should not purchase an amplifier based on the power handling rating of the speakers, even a 50 watt amplifier will drive the towers to extremely loud listening levels. The power handling rating of a loudspeaker is simply a guide to what is the maximum recommended power you can feed the speakers. Realistically, most consumers will never feed more then 20 watts continuous into the towers as even this seemingly small amount of power will produce over 96dB (extremely loud) at 8 feet back in an average listening environment. There is no difference between 20 watts from a 100 watt amp or 20 watts from a 300 watt amp.

    Choose your amplifier's power output by the speaker's sensitivity rating, how far back you will be positioned from the speaker and your listening preferences. Considering dynamic headroom capability, 105dB max peak output is about as loud as anyone should ever listen at. With that in mind, assuming you are listening at 8 feet back, 2 speakers, and accounting for room gain, 100 watt amplifier (rated into 8 ohms) is a very good choice.

    Hope this helps!
    .
    .
    .
    Good Sound To You!

    David Fabrikant
    www.ascendacoustics.com

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Sierra Tower Specifications, Measurements, Pricing

    Quote Originally Posted by davef View Post
    The impedance rating of a loudspeaker does not affect the power ratings for the loudspeaker itself. In other words, if the speaker is rated at 100 watts max input power, it would be 100 watts max regardless of the impedance rating of the loudspeaker.



    Your amplifier does not need to be rated into a 4 ohm load as the Sierra Towers are a rather easy load to drive. In addition, you should not purchase an amplifier based on the power handling rating of the speakers, even a 50 watt amplifier will drive the towers to extremely loud listening levels. The power handling rating of a loudspeaker is simply a guide to what is the maximum recommended power you can feed the speakers. Realistically, most consumers will never feed more then 20 watts continuous into the towers as even this seemingly small amount of power will produce over 96dB (extremely loud) at 8 feet back in an average listening environment. There is no difference between 20 watts from a 100 watt amp or 20 watts from a 300 watt amp.

    Choose your amplifier's power output by the speaker's sensitivity rating, how far back you will be positioned from the speaker and your listening preferences. Considering dynamic headroom capability, 105dB max peak output is about as loud as anyone should ever listen at. With that in mind, assuming you are listening at 8 feet back, 2 speakers, and accounting for room gain, 100 watt amplifier (rated into 8 ohms) is a very good choice.

    Hope this helps!
    Thanks for the explanation, Dave--very informative!

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Sierra Tower Specifications, Measurements, Pricing

    Are the towers good for only 5-7 feet listening distance? And do you place them directly on carpet? thanks!

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    NW Pennsylvania
    Posts
    433

    Default Re: Sierra Tower Specifications, Measurements, Pricing

    Quote Originally Posted by sunlight99 View Post
    Are the towers good for only 5-7 feet listening distance? And do you place them directly on carpet? thanks!
    Placing the speakers on carpet works fine. The added sound dampening from carpet is a plus.
    Nate

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •